House Plant Guide

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With social distancing in place, we’ve all been spending more time at home, which makes now the perfect time to brighten up your space with some greenery. Whether you have a green thumb or not, many indoor plants are low-maintenance and thrive with little effort from you. Here is your guide to finding easy-to-care-for house plants that will bring some new life into your home.

 

Bright Light

If your home lets in a lot of natural light, try one of these indoor plants.

  1. Sago Palm — Bring some tropical vibes into your home with your own mini palm tree. They can handle partial shade, but prefer full sun with a moderate amount of moisture in their soil. 
  2. Chinese Money Plant  — Who says money doesn’t grow on trees? Place this plant in a light spot, but avoid direct sunlight. It prefers a well-draining potting soil with drainage holes in their pot. Watering once a week will suffice.
  3. Snake Plant — This plant can withstand full sun and also handle low light, but indirect light is best. Allow the soil to dry between waterings, adding water once every 10 days or so. 

 

Low Light

No worries if your home doesn’t get much sunlight — these plants do well in a low-light environment.

  1. Yucca Cane — An oldie but a goodie — this has been a popular house plant for generations. It tolerates low, medium and bright light. Water once every 10 days.
  2. Pothos — This plant does well in low-light conditions as well as bright light. Let soil dry out between waterings. 
  3. Monstera — This is one of the most recognizable plants used in interior design. It can survive in lower light conditions and requires watering once a week. 

 

Infrequent Watering

If you travel a lot, your schedule is very full or if you tend to be forgetful, these plants require very little attention.

  1. String of Pearls — Plant in a well-drained pot and set in indirect sunlight. This plant only requires watering once every two weeks.
  2. Aloe — Aloe is not only aesthetically pleasing but also very useful. Place in bright, indirect sunlight and heavily water once every three weeks. 
  3. Lucky Bamboo — This plant is known to bring good energy into your home. It tolerates low light well. Watering is simple — completely cover the roots with water and change it every 6-8 weeks. 

 

Pet/Child Safe

Did you know many common household plants can be toxic to cats and dogs? It’s important to do your research on plants you’re planning to bring in to your home to ensure they are safe for pets and small children.

  1. African Violet — This plant may bloom all year round in the right conditions. Keep it in bright light but avoid direct sunlight. It prefers room temperature water. You’ll know it’s time to water again when the leaves are limp and the soil is dry on top. 
  2. Baby’s Tears — These are great because they cover soil and discourage pets from digging. They prefer medium light and need frequent watering. 
  3. Spider Plant — This plant will grow in conditions ranging from medium to bright light, but will burn in direct sunlight. Watering once a week should be sufficient to keep the soil moist. 

 

And if you’re still not feeling totally confident in your ability to care for a houseplant, a realistic-looking fake plant may do the trick!

Categories: DIY, Homeowner, How to, Shorewest Tips, Uncategorized

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